Morning Sky

Have you ever watched the sun rise in a mountain town?

It’s a pretty amazing sight, and somehow… it gets better each time.

The sky begins to turn from black to midnight blue. Light appears like a torch over the eastern hills. The stars fade and make their final plea to be gazed upon, though there are a few that fight through the light.

A slow rise begins, as deep orange flows into purple and blue. The silhouette of the pine trees against the morning hue is quite beautiful, as they appear black rather than green.

Oh, the beauty of a sunrise in a mountain town.

In times like these, it’s easy to be thankful…if you let yourself be in the here and now. In the crisp morning chill my fingers stiffen as I type, but the hot coffee keeps me warm on the inside. The birds sing their song, and there are few other sounds to be heard.

It’s easy to be thankful in times like these, but it is also possible to let them pass by our whole life. Ferris Bueller offers possibly some of the best advice on life you will ever receive:

“Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” – Ferris Bueller (From the movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”)

I’ve come to realize that gratefulness leads to contentment, and contentment frees our minds from unnecessary clutter. In contentment we can pursue dreams, in contentment we can see purpose. In contentment we can see beyond ourselves into the world around us; the lives around us. In contentment, we find the ability to be present.

Mornings like this inspire me, and I hold them in my mind. May you find your mountain town sunrise, whatever that may be for you; and may it inspire you, and bring you hope.

Oh, the beauty of a morning sky.



Fear “Less”

Self realization can be a bittersweet experience.

On one hand, we find peace in a revelation of a purpose unveiled, or a new found perspective on life. On the other hand; we can be met with sadness or pain at the realization of a character flaw, opportunities missed, or various forms of regret. In my experience, both sides of self realization are necessary to bring a fullness of life.

I have been doing some serious soul searching this past year, and I have had to come to grips with certain aspects of who I am, and what I’ve done (or haven’t done). It takes a toll, but it’s worth it to truly live. Whether through reading, writing, meditations, conversations, running, and the like; a new way of approaching life has been revealing itself to me. 

I found a form of this self realization a couple weeks go in Puerto Peñasco, Mexico. Now this wasn’t my first trip south of the border, but it was only the second time we had gone since we had kids. Over this past decade, I have let the news of kidnapping, drug cartels, and human trafficking detour me from venturing into Mexico. I ascribed these isolated crimes to the whole of Mexico because I didn’t know any better; and this was a decision based  on fear of the unknown.

What I discovered on this trip, was a city welcoming us with open arms. I saw families joining together in community. I experienced great patience from our Mexican brothers  and sisters as I fumbled through broken spanglish and failed attempts at “sign language”.

I found a new perspective, and my world just got a whole lot bigger.

Each day we decide who we are going to be, and the choices we make matter.

Do our choices align with our goals?

I long for love and adventure. I long to be a strong father, spouse, and friend. I long to be a skilled musician. I want to be out on the trails. All of these are attainable if I live more fearless.

There is a line we walk between fear and trust, may we trust that the struggle is worth it. “Hedge our lives towards what could go right instead of what could go wrong.” (That was a quote from my friend Eric Hanson; and if you like that quote, check him out at

Perhaps approaching life like this will open doors to adventure, impact, and a heart full and alive.

Of Death and Life

“The life of the dead is placed in the memory of the living.”Marcus Tullius Cicero

I was listening to some Harry Belafonte the other day, and this silly song came on about an ugly dad whose kids are ashamed of him because he is ugly (Mamma Look a Boo Boo);  and I started laughing, because it is a song that my dad would have loved. My dad was not ugly, but it was something that he loved to joke about as he got older and lost more teeth; and he loved it when me and my brother would razz him about it.

I had my bro listen to the song when he visited and he loved it (I’m pretty sure my mom would love it too). We started reminiscing about our dad, his life, his death, and his strength leading up to death. Since that visit, I’ve been thinking more about death and how we respond to it.

We are surrounded by people affected death, though we don’t always know it. Most, if not all, who cross our path daily are not too far removed from a loss of some sort; whether it be a family member, a friend, or an acquaintance. Maybe some folks are supporting a friend who has just lost someone.

Personally, I have friends where death has hit so close to home, that it has formed who they are, as well as how they care for others who suffer a loss. There are others in my life who have had to brush up much too close with the looming fear of death, that it has also shaped their framework for life.

Having lost, as well as grieving with others who have lost; I have learned a few insights that I would love to share.

Dealing with it

There is not a specific way we are supposed to deal with death. The important thing is that we deal with it. We must face it and we must accept it…we must let it ruminate in our hearts and our minds. If we try to be overly optimistic, or minimize our lost because it is not as extreme as someone else’s loss; we miss the beauty and importance of the impact it can have in our life, and we can minimize the memory of that person.

Many problems in our life can be fixed, many of our situations can be changed; but death is finite. The defining line that death draws, draws us in to a reflection of life.

Here are some of the ways I dealt:

  • I cried. I let it happen when it needed to happen. If the tears would not come, I would make time to cry. This may sound silly, but it helps.
  • I wrote. My blogging started with my dad’s death. I had to let his passing be known to  as many people who knew him as I could, so I wrote an online eulogy that sparked something inside.
  • I got counseling. There was other stuff going on in my life that moved me in this direction as well, but it opened me up in a way that I didn’t know I needed.

The balance between acceptance and hope

Once you have lost someone to an illness such as cancer, or any rare disease, the reality of our fragility and mortality becomes more apparent. Moving forward, we are more sensitive to the possibility of the worst case scenario; though we need not succumb to it. There is a line that must be walked in face of illness, injury, and unknown; and it runs between acceptance and hope. Acceptance is our ability to see the face value of the potential reality, and hope is optimist that clings to what our hearts desire. If we can float in this space, then the lives around us benefit from it; We learn and we teach at the same time.

Hope helps us make the most of this life, and the time that we have. It allows us to persevere and endure, though all around may be crumbling.

The Response

I was looking up the origin of my last name Grayum, and it all goes back to Graham. It must be the americanized version of the name I guess. The Graham family crest has the house words on it, which are: Ne Oublie, which translated means “Do not forget.”

Therefore, I do not forget. I remember and respond; and I allow the memory of this man to feed my life moving forward.

Wherever you are in you journey, do not forget those that have gone before us. Be with those who are here now. Remember… in all things, there is always hope.


The Life we Live

“If you look at what you have in life, you’ll always have more. If you look at what you don’t have in life, you’ll never have enough.” —Oprah Winfrey

I stumbled across this quote while searching for inspiration one morning.

They are simple words put into a simple phrase, yet they hold a deep wisdom. The less is more philosophy is as old as time, and it is as relevant as ever. Here are some of the areas of life we can apply these words:

Possessions. This one is obvious, but it always needs to be addressed; because it takes practice, discipline, and self-control to be content with what we have. Also, it takes a level of maturity to be able to appreciate and be happy for someone else’s purchase or creation without feeling the need to have one for yourself too.

“If we are continually embracing contentment, we will find ourselves feeling inspiration rather than envy.”

Purpose.  Purpose, meaning, dreams, goals; these words are all associated with each other. I have a tendency to have my head in the clouds at times when I think about what I want to accomplish in life; and while it’s necessary to dream big, there is a balance with the here and now. I have been wracking my brain this past year trying to figure “what is my purpose in life”, and I ask myself this question each day. Then it hit me, perhaps the reason I could not find this epiphany I was looking for was because I was looking to far away from home… from that which I already have.

I work at a place with vast opportunity for impact, growth, and development… if I bring my best. I have a wife who has dreams that I play a part in, if only I begin to entertain those dreams as my own as well. I have two amazing daughters who are some of the most creative and inspiring humans I know; and they have been given to me. I have the privilege to pour love and encouragement into their lives, and guide them towards living an impactful life in this world.

Boom! Epiphany in the face.

“Greatness and purpose does not always lie in the unknown or uncharted territory.”

Craft. We each have a skill that we bring to the table, whether you know it or not.  Life expects something from us, and it expects nothing less than our best. Inside each of us, there are seeds of aptitude; a readiness to learn, develop, and create. We are born into this world with the greatest gift anyone could ask for…our minds. We come into this world with eyes full of wonder; and if we look at what we can bring to the world instead of tasking ourselves to master someone else’s craft, you may be surprised at what you are capable of.

Though we find ourselves moved deeply by a beautiful song, that doesn’t mean we have to be a musician. Because we are moved by the beauty of a painting, the thought put into each stroke of the brush; does not mean we have to be a painter. On the other hand, if you find yourself taking the reins at work, in your home, or even in planning a group hangout; perhaps you may have a natural tendency  to be a leader. If you find yourself deeply affected by stories of oppression, or people hurting; perhaps you have been gifted with a strong sense of empathy and compassion, both of which this world needs.

May we wake each day with eyes full of wonder, and a heart full of love. May we dream big, but start by looking at the life we are already living.



“I am awake…..and it’s 3:00 am.”

That is what I said to myself as I sat in the living room this morning.  I actually woke up at 1:00 AM, and just couldn’t fall back asleep. There are a few reasons I couldn’t sleep; an active train of thought, sore muscles, (potty break?), or maybe I was just supposed to be awake.

Whenever this happens to me, I wonder if there is something I am supposed to do; some specific reason that I woke in the middle of the night. Perhaps my mind is in a special place to create, or maybe a prayer needs to be spoken. In those twilight hours, these are the decisions I had to make:

Meditate myself to sleep? om, om, om..not going to sleep I guess.

Get frustrated? Well that doesn’t do anybody any good, and it doesn’t help you fall asleep.

Just lay there? My body was protesting that one.

Get out of bed? Okay, let’s try that.

So many good things in our lives start with that decision to get out of bed. A decision to begin, a choice to move. 

And there it is! A tid-bit of wisdom for my day. Though it is not much more than a simple phrase, it is something I can offer; and therefore it was worth getting out of bed.

 One of my favorite quotes about getting started is from J.R.R. Tolkien:

“It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.” 



Good Things

I have heard it said that “you can never have too much of a good thing”, and I believed that for a time. What I have found during the last year though is quite a different train of thought.

I discovered that too much good food can make me feel sick, and potentially pack on unnecessary and unwanted fat. Too much good coffee can keep me awake all night. Many clothes means more laundry, and it also means more closet or dresser space. Ultimately, I realized that I had been brought up in a culture of more. Seeking a good deal not to save money, but to have money left over for more stuff; and the more I bought, the more I wanted….truly a vicious cycle.

I remember being frustrated with life a couple of years ago. Some bad stuff happened, but I believe that just drew out and maximized the discontent that was already growing inside of me; and I was trying to hide it.

Life was good. Life was so good, yet I allowed comparisons, expectations, and regret to convince me that I had a right to be unhappy. I had become accustomed to instant gratification instead of long term gain. I resisted investing money, but jumped on a chance to buy another shirt, get a hotel, or go out to dinner. I needed to feel wanted and included by everyone in my life, so I laid unfair expectations on my friends and family. I wanted more…more of everything, and it was destroying who I was.

One of the events a couple years ago that brought me closer to rock bottom (figuratively) was the death of my dad. Diagnosed with lung cancer at the end of November 2015, he died January 4, 2016. He was a rock in my life, and I missed him (and still miss him) more than I thought I ever would. Later that year, I slipped off of a boulder while rock climbing, and landed face first. I lost two teeth, broke four more, and split open my chin and lip…literal rock bottom.

I had a month off of work after that accident. I couldn’t do much, talk much, or eat much; but I had plenty of time alone with my thoughts. That was not a place I wanted to be. I usually kept busy to handle sadness, anger, or disappointment; but now, I had to deal with it. I could no longer hide in a crowd, or behind a smile… literally.

Now let’s jump forward. 2016 ended much better than it started. I had sought out some counseling (at the request of my ever so patient, loving, and tolerant wife), and began to truly deal with who I was. It wasn’t easy, and it wasn’t pretty; but it was good. I didn’t want to run away from my emotions any more, I wanted to understand why I was feeling the way I was, and get to the root of the issues. I began to declutter my life, which inevitably led me to find minimalism.

I found that less truly was more, and I removed a lot of stuff (both physical and emotional) from my life. I began to find it easier to focus on what mattered and accept who I was. I had to learn from mistakes instead of dwelling and covering them up. I had to look at each day as a gift, as a chance to live better than the day before.

My family and I have removed A LOT of stuff from our house, and we have developed a renewed appreciation for what we already have. We have tried to consume less, and have a level of mindfulness for what we do consume. We have a long way to go, but this is a journey not a destination. Since joining the “minimalist” movement, I have found a greater sense of purpose; and a greater sense of responsibility to share our story.

Perhaps “you can’t have too much of a good thing” is intended to transcend possessions or consumables altogether. Perhaps the intangible aspects of life such as friendship, mindfulness, focus, compassion, and the like are the intent of the phrase.

Let us bring much good to this world, and may we find enjoyment along the way.







A Walk at Dawn: Dreams to Pursue

A walk at dawn is pretty amazing.

There is a stillness, a quietness in the air. The stars make their final plea to be seen and gazed upon, and the chill reminds you that you are alive. 

“When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive – to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love.” – Marcus Aurelius

Today is a gift; another chance to create, another day to dream. As always, focus is needed; because there is a world of opportunity out there. We need focus, because each of us has apart to play in this world.

We cannot do everything, but each of us can do something.

I’ve been reading and listening to a lot of content related to dreams and goals. We need to have our goals before us daily if we wish to achieve them. Whether big or small, it takes commitment and perseverance to see your dreams come true.  Our dreams must be pursued. We cannot let them be thrown out or forgotten; though they may take a lifetime to achieve.

One of my favorite holiday movies is It’s a Wonderful Life. I love that movie because George Bailey is a dreamer. He had grand ideas for travel and engineering, and doing anything but run the family business; but what happens? Life circumstances placed on him the responsibility of the family business, and he stepped up to the task. What he expected from life, was a little different that what life expected of him.

When he came to his existential decision point of throwing his life away, an angel appears and takes him on a journey through a world without him. He finds that all of the everyday decisions he had made in life, actually had an impact on so many of the lives around him. Life had thrown a curve ball, and he thought that he had struck out (sports analogies). Up to the point of despair, his dreams had kept him moving forward, pursuing a better world, and impacting lives around him.

A dream is a powerful force for momentum. 

In the end he realized that he truly had a wonderful life. I love the book by Dr. Seuss Oh, The Places You’ll Go. It inspires and reminds us that things may not always go our way, but we must press on.


You’ll be on y our way up!
You’ll be seeing great sights!
You’ll join the high fliers
who soar to high heights.

You won’t lag behind, because you’ll have the speed.
You’ll pass the whole gang and you’ll soon take the lead.
Wherever you fly, you’ll be best of the best.
Wherever you go, you will top all the rest.

Except when you don’t.
Because, sometimes, you won’t.

I’m sorry to say so
but, sadly, it’s true
that Bang-ups
and Hang-ups
can happen to you….

But on you will go
though the weather be foul.
On you will go
though your enemies prowl.
On you will go
though the Hakken-Kraks howl.
Onward up many
a frightening creek,
though your arms may get sore
and your sneakers may leak.

On and on you will hike,
And I know you’ll hike far
and face up to your problems
whatever they are…  

As we move through each day, may we seek focus to define and seek our dreams daily. No matter what may come our way, we must stay true.

Here is some of the content that has inspired me:

Man’s Search for Meaning by Dr. Viktor Frankl

It’s a Wonderful life

Lasso the Moon –Podcast by Brian Buffini

Oh, the Places You’ll Go by Dr. Seuss




At year’s end

As the year comes to a close…

It’s that time of year for reflection and action as we learn from the days behind us, and look forward to the days ahead. The here and now is a good place to be. There is much joy, and much to be thankful for during the holidays; as well as a chance to dig deep. Amidst all of this, there is a dance between joy; and at times, an unexplainable sadness.

Goodness, kindness, and community are highlighted during the Christmas season. It is embedded in the movies we watch and the songs we sing; a hope for a better world, and a hope for change. We cheer for Scrooge, who finally sees that people are the most precious commodity. We shed tears of joy as George Bailey discovers that the wonderful life he has been searching for has been right in front of him the whole time.

Now the sadness, well there must be a reason and a place for it too right?

The holidays are also a time for togetherness, which can potentially make time alone feel well… lonely. I believe that this idea of togetherness highlights those who are no longer with us, and still hold a part of our hearts. All of us have lost someone to some extent; whether it be death to the body,  the heart that has lost hope, or a relationship faded. All things that have passed need to be mourned.

This aloneness does not have to equate to loneliness; it may be necessary.

 These times may be a call to reflect, remember, accept, or take action.

Who we are and what we do matters in this life. 

We live in the space between joy and sadness, so we must seek the purpose that is within that space.

Starting Somewhere

“Well, you gotta start somewhere,” I said to myself the other morning.

I woke up with a mind full of ideas, and about an hour until I had to leave for work. There was so much that I wanted to do, and it was a little overwhelming. I was thinking about projects at work, an upcoming Christmas party, playing guitar, writing a blog, New Year’s Eve plans, writing a story, reading Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson (part of the Stormlight Archive, fun read), hitting the trails, doing some push ups, and the list went on… and on. All this at 5:15am, and I had only been awake for a few minutes.

“Just breathe,” I said to myself. “Start there, and lay a foundation for success.”

So I decided to close me eyes and breathe. It was an exercise in meditation, and it was hard to get started. It takes a lot of effort to calm a mind, to de-clutter thoughts; but once you get started, it begins to make more sense. After about 5-7 minutes, the feeling of anxiety had left; and instead, a sense of peace came over me. The need to do everything was replaced with do something, which is right where we need to be.

The rest of my time that morning was spent reading, and it was good.

I felt focused and ready to take on the day at my workplace, and I was very effective.

It was a good day, all the way into the night; and throughout the day I reflected on the idea of starting somewhere. All the good we bring to this world comes from intention, and success does not come without doing the work.

So what started as a breath, is actually a foundation for success.

Tales from the Trails

I was running some trails last night up on Observatory Mesa here in Flagstaff AZ, and I found myself drifting into some deep reflection. These trails in particular are behind the neighborhood we lived in for 12 years, and I hadn’t run up there much since we moved two years ago.

The sun was setting, and dusk was here. The wind was blowing, and a slight mist began to fall. A dusky mist is a magical experience.

I have spent many hours on that Mesa on solo runs, pack runs, and family hikes. There are lots of memories, and lots of dreams. This latest solo run, in particular, spawned the idea for this blog. A series of reflections from trail runs.

Trail running has been part of my life for the past 6 years or so. I have experienced community and brotherhood, pain and suffering, adventures, fear, extreme heat, and extreme cold. I have found myself laughing out loud, talking to myself, and even singing out loud. I have also had runs full of tears, not from physical pain, but from deep emotions that were unlocked through the experience.

My goal is to write something after each run that speaks to me, and I hope this connects to anyone who enjoys experiencing life or digging deep.

Now…I think I’m going to hit the trails.